image
image

“Unlocking the body’s potential”

THE TPI PERFORMANCE MOVEMENT SCREEN is a group of 16 tests that give valuable insight into each individual golfer’s biomechanics. This is NOT swing analysis. These tests will reveal where an individual athlete has a “mobility” dysfunction or where they may have a “stability” dysfunction.

According to Gray Cook, the author of “Movement”, mobility is defined as “ the combination of normal joint range of motion and proper muscle flexibility”. Essentially, are we able to get into the furthest ranges of the swing – how far back can we get into the back swing and how far can we get into the follow through. More importantly, it gives us insight into how well we can get into postur...

Read more

temp-post-image

Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Certification

As those who follow us on Facebook/Twitter saw from our risqué post, this weekend was all about golf swing mechanics and human performance. I had the pleasure of attending a Titleist Performance Institute Certification Course over the past week in beautiful Long Beach, CA. This was truly one of the best courses that I have taken! Packed with insightful information about golf, swing mechanics and the human body, I will definitely be transferring some of this knowledge to other sports injuries. Over the coming weeks, I will be writing a series on golf injuries, prevention and performance.

For those of you who don’t know, TPI is a golf specific performance program designed to support all levels of athletes from PGA Tour p...

Read more

temp-post-image

Sydney George is our 1st Athlete of the Month!

Sydney is a 16 year old ringette player from Stony Plain, AB. She battled back from injury to lead her team to the Western Canadian Ringette Championship in Winnipeg, MB.


Individually, she won the tournament scoring race (5 GP 17 G 9A 26 Pts) by more than double the second closest player, scoring more goals than the next player had total points! This earned her the Most Valuable Player of the Tournament award and a spot on the Tournament All Star Team!


Great job Sydney! We know you have great things in your ringette future.

Read more

Excellent course to keep you on the course and out of rehab #TPILBC

temp-post-image


Read more

temp-post-image
Read more

temp-post-image
Read more

temp-post-image

Read more

What a great way to start off the New Year!! Congrats to Natalie Scheriber on finishing 2nd female and 3rd overall at the 24hr race with 184km!!! We are so very proud of all your hard work...keep it up!!

temp-post-image

Read more

temp-post-image

You may have been stretching wrong your entire life...

There’s a lot of information floating around regarding when to stretch, how long to stretch for, which routines are most effective, etc. It can become confusing, so let’s simplify it by breaking it down into two broad groups: static stretching and dynamic stretching. Static means stationary; when you think of classic stretching routines like touching your toes and holding for 10 seconds you’re thinking of static stretches. Dynamic means in motion; this is where you use momentum from movements to actively stretch muscles or muscle groups.

The popularity of static stretching has dipped recently with studies showing that it may decrease strength or power if used before exercise. Basically, muscles must remain between certain lengths in order to contract with an optimal amount of force, and static stretching can lengthen them to the point where they are outside of this ideal range. This does not, however, make static stretching obsolete – as we will soon discuss.

The fall of static stretching has made room for the rise of dynamic stretching – and here’s why you should be adding it to your fitness routine. Dynamic stretching safely and effectively warms up your muscles without extending them past their optimal length, meaning it’s a perfect pre-exercise routine because you will not experience a drop-off in power. The bottom-line is that you get all the benefits of a proper warm-up with no decrease in muscular strength.

Although dynamic stretching has taken the fitness world by storm, static stretching still has an important role in any exercise routine. The temporary muscle-lengthening effect has no impact post-exercise, and static stretching has been shown to improve range of motion and mobility, so be sure to finish off your routine by sitting down and stretching it out the good old-fashioned way.

Jarett Schaumberger, BScKin

Read more

temp-post-image

What’s Causing the Pain along the Inside of my Shins?

Medial tibial stress syndrome, also known as shin splints, are a common issue for both athletes and military members. Classified as an overuse injury, the actual cause of shin splints is unknown, but most experts agree that micro-trauma to the soft tissue surrounding the tibia and the resulting inflammatory response are at fault.

MTSS can begin with minor pain on the inside of the shin-bone during or after physical activity. The muscles immediately behind the tibia become tender or inflamed, and these symptoms can quickly escalate to the point where pain persists during normal daily activities. If left untreated, stress fractures can begin to form along the tibia, which in extreme cases may result in a compound fracture. Just search “Paul George compound fracture” if you want to see the worst-case scenario – warning, content is very graphic.

Risk-factors for shin splints include: high impact activities (i.e., basketball), poor flexibility, excessive pronation (see our article on pronators), or too much time spent walking or running. Military members tend to be susceptible to this condition due to due to a combination of the last three risk-factors outlined.

The good news is that shin splints are treatable. Orthotics, exercise programs, stretching regimens, and soft-tissue manipulation are all viable options. The experts at Athletes’ Advantage Physiotherapy can help with your MTSS related pain, so contact us at 780-460-9977 or info@ptadvantage.ca for your assessment!

Read more